Bev’s Chocolate Chip Cookies

One highlight of my Chicago trip was meeting a very famous nutritionist. She wasn’t involved with my particular cooking contest, but rather another event taking place at the hotel. I was in line to speak with the concierge, turned around, and there she was. Now I am usually way too shy to do this, but for some reason I just burst out “Are you (aforementioned famous nutritionist)? Wow! It’s nice to meet you! I’m a big fan!” She was very polite and sweet, despite the fact that I must have come off as a moron, asking her if she was who I thought she was when she was wearing a name badge. Lucky for her, I did not pull out my camera and ask to get a picture of her for my cookie blog.

Despite the fact that I love baking goodies, I read a lot about nutrition and try to eat a sensible diet. It’s not as strict as some, but it’s not 100% cookies and wine.
So to celebrate being in the presence of nutrition greatness, this week I am going to make more wholesome cookies. Not low-fat cookies, not low-cal, but cookies with some nutritional value. I’m starting today with this recipe from Eating Well magazine. This chocolate chip cookie recipe uses oats, whole wheat flour, less than the usual amount of butter, canola oil, dark chocolate (because chocolate is health food these days, right?) and uh, well…..that’s all. Personally, I think it should call for nuts so I added them in below as “optional”.

Below is my version of Bev/Eating Well’s recipe. I didn’t beat the butter and egg mixture as in the original because I didn’t feel like pulling out the electric mixer. Instead, I just mixed it with a spoon. I also baked the cookies for only 11-12 minutes – any longer would have burnt them in my oven, so watch closely. And finally, I used dark chocolate chunks instead of chips. The cookies turned out great. If you measure very carefully with a rounded teaspoon, you should get close to 30.

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BEV’S CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES (Adapted from Eating Well)

3/4 cup rolled oats
1 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup butter — softened
1/4 cup canola oil
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
6 ounces dark chocolate chunks (I used leftover dark chocolate Dove eggs)
1/3 cup toasted walnuts, pecans or Brazil nuts (optional)

Preheat oven to 350°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment or use non-stick cookie sheets.

Grind oats in a blender or food processor. Transfer to a medium bowl and stir in flour, baking soda and salt.

In another large bowl, stir together butter, oil, granulated sugar, brown sugar, egg and vanilla until smooth and creamy. Add the dry ingredients and stir until just combined. Stir in chocolate and nuts. Chill dough for thicker cookies.

Drop the dough by rounded teaspoonfuls, at least 1 inch apart, onto the prepared baking sheets. Bake cookies, 1 sheet at a time, until firm around the edges and golden on top, about 11 or 12 minutes. Cool the cookies for 2 minutes on the baking sheets, then transfer to wire racks to cool completely.

30 cookies

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Comments

  1. says

    These look great. I often use whole wheat flour to baked goods to add a little fiber. Have you tried whole wheat pastry flour? I really can’t tell the difference between that and white flour, yet it still has all the nutritional value. Very fun that you met Marion Nestle! I also wanted to say that your lava cakes look wonderful and I’ve never seen anything like them. With my husband being a huge PB fan, I might give them a try.

  2. says

    How awesome that you met Nestle! I read her “Food Politics” and it sure was a fascinating and thought-provoking read! It got me to re-think my grocery shopping habits and made me more cynical about grocery stores and food advertising.

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