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Eagle Mills (Ultragrain) Flour Test

by on December 21, 2007 · 16 comments

When I was a kid, whole grains came in the form of Roman Meal Bread and the occasional packet of flavored instant oatmeal. My mom didn’t cook, and even if she did, things like brown rice, couscous, and quinoa were eaten by pale people who liked macramé ….at least in my world. This was Texas, remember.

But things are different now. The grocery store down the street sells ancient grain breads, brown rice you can zap in 2 minutes, 11 different types of couscous and even quinoa. And if we’re not in the mood for anything remotely healthy sounding, we can find whole grains hidden in white bread, sweetened cereals, cookies and even goldfish snacks.

What I’m leading up to is that I got an email the other day from Eagle Mills telling me about yet another source of whole grains in disguise – their new 100% whole wheat flour which they say has “white flour appeal”. The secret is something called Ultragrain.  Eagle Mills PR team offered to send me a sample, but I told them I’d buy it myself and write about it only if I liked it.

Shortly after they’d told me about the product, I checked the local grocery store to see if the Ultragrain/Eagle Mills flour was even available. I expected it wouldn’t be and if so, it would be pricey. It wasn’t. A 5 pound bag was $1.99, which was pretty good! I bought it, put it away and waited for a good opportunity to use it.

A few days later, I had to make a big batch of sugar cookies for Fuzz’s Holiday party. Thinking the little kids would be too busy decorating to notice the cookies were whole grain, I made them with Eagle Mills using the same proportions I would use with my usual flour. The cookies tasted the same as always.

The next day, I used it again in the pumpkin chocolate chip cookies and didn’t taste any whole grain. The cookies were very soft, but I’m fairly certain that was from the pumpkin.

The final test was today. I used it in one of our favorite chocolate chip cookies recipes. Again, no difference. I haven’t used the flour in anything but cookies, but based on the results, I’d be comfortable using it in just about anything. While we might only be getting a couple of tablespoons of flour per serving, every little bit of whole grain adds up. 

 Here’s a picture of what the bag looks like along with the cookies I made this morning. 

whole wheat chocolate chip cookies

Chocolate Chip Cookies — Half Batch

1 1/2 cups plus 2 tablespoons all purpose flour (7 1/4 ounces)
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup granulated sugar (3 1/2 oz)
1/2 cup dark brown sugar, packed (3 1/4 oz)
1/3 cup unsalted butter, softened (2 3/4 oz)
1/3 cup vegetable shortening (butter flavored) (2 ¼ oz)
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
1/3 cup to 1/2 cup bittersweet chocolate chips (or dark or milk)
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts or pecans (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Stir together flour, baking soda and salt; Set aside.

Using high speed of an electric mixer, beat both sugars, butter and shortening until creamy. Reduce speed to low and mix in egg and vanilla – do not overbeat after adding the egg.

Add flour mixture to butter mixture and stir until flour is incorporated. Add chocolate chips and nuts (if using)

Drop cookies by rounded teaspoonfuls onto ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 12 minutes or until golden around edges and set. Transfer to a rack to cool.

Maks 20 (or so) cookies

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Published on December 21, 2007

{ 16 comments… read them below or add one }

kelly December 21, 2007 at 12:44 pm

This is a random question, but have you tried any of the Pillsbury reduced sugar products??? A few family members have diabetes I am looking for user reviews before i actually purchase.

Anna December 21, 2007 at 12:52 pm

Kelly, I don’t use a lot of reduced sugar/artificially sweetened products these days. However, if I had diabetes I certainly would. So while I can’t personally review those products, I am fairly certain they are good. Pillsbury has a new forum on their website where people discuss products. You may want to check there or just Google around for various reviews.

Now I have tried their sugar free chocolate chip cookie dough. It’s been a while, but I do remember those cookies as being very good for a sugar free product.

Therese December 21, 2007 at 1:27 pm

Kelly–

I will keep you posted on diabetic recipes. I have a daughter/Molly (16), who was recently diagnosed with Type 1. I have made a chocolate chip cookie with the splenda/brown sugar product. They were actually pretty good! There website is awesome too. Worth checking out for updates/recipes…etc. Also, I found that Better Homes and Gardens puts out a Diabetic Living magazine. That is a great source too! Hope this helps a little!

Anna December 21, 2007 at 1:45 pm

I came across Diabetic Living in the doctor’s office the other day. Some of the recipes (the non-sweet ones) looked fabulous.

Also, I’ve noticed with artificial sweeteners it’s best to use the recipes the sweetener companies have on their sites rather than just substitute here and there.

Stephanie December 21, 2007 at 2:23 pm

I’ve been using this flour almost exclusively. I love it and notice no difference in cooking or baking. And the price is great!

Gigi December 21, 2007 at 3:07 pm

I bought a 2-pack of 10# bags from Sam’s Club a few months ago, never realizing it was 100% whole wheat flour. Go figure! I used it in a fairly wide array of recipes (brownies, cakes, cookies, pie dough, gravy, etc.) and never noticed a taste or texture difference.

Way to go, Eagle Mills!

Lisa Ernst December 21, 2007 at 3:11 pm

Anna, thanks so much for this review! I try to use whole grain products as much as possible but I usually make an exception for most types of cookies. I will definitely give this flour a try. Yea!

Stacy December 21, 2007 at 6:08 pm

Hmmm….They don’t have this in NYC area. Darn it. But I’ll be on the lookout. Anna, I will get you the fudge recipe, I promise but I really just wanted to wish you Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Thanks for everything you do…you’re amazing and read your blog faithly – ok, some might say I’m addicted but its a good addiction. :o)

Anna December 21, 2007 at 8:29 pm

I’m glad to hear I’m not the first one to try this and like it.

Stacy, thanks for the compliment and good luck finding this flour. Based on all the rave reviews it’s getting, I imagine it will show up in the NY area soon.

Tracy December 21, 2007 at 8:49 pm

I wonder if this is the same stuff as King Arthur White Whole Wheat Flour. I’ve used that with very good results.

Anna December 21, 2007 at 9:25 pm

Tracy, the concept is similar. I don’t know much about KA’s except that it is more expensive. One nice thing about this was the price.

tram January 8, 2008 at 2:26 pm

Where can you find Eagle Mills?? I live in San Diego and Vons, Ralphs, Whole Foods or Bistrol Farms don’t carry it. If anyone knows, please tell me.

Alison February 25, 2008 at 3:11 pm

Delicious! Another success from your site! This one was picked by my son who is becoming a
browser of your site when feeling peckish!

Tram March 8, 2008 at 6:38 pm

Eagle Mill’s Flour with Ultragrain is really hard to find in Southern California, especially now that Netgrocer.com doesn’t carry it. Has anyone tried the King Arthur’s White Whole Wheat flour? If you have, can you tell me if can use it cup for cup for regular unbleached all-purpose white flour?

Angela November 4, 2008 at 8:03 pm

Last night I made my best ever pasta from scratch. Even today as leftovers, it never stuck together. I kept thinking, it must be the flour I used. I’ve made this recipe before, but this time it came out superb.

After reading here, I realized I used Eagle Mills with ultragrain. I never even realized what I had purchased, but reading here made me go and look. I am now totally sold on this flour for everything..

Anna November 4, 2008 at 8:07 pm

Angela, that’s great! I made pasta from scratch years and years ago, but never did it again. Glad to hear the Ultra-Grain worked well.

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